South-West Somalia Diaspora Initiatives
                  {Health & Wellness, Literacy & Sustainable Economic & Social Development}

                                                              
Challenge -Hope - Aspiration


Integrity - Transparent - Accountabilty - Partnership - Teamwork              

 

                                              
SWS
People are our Platform
A Promising ZONE
 Like slavery and apartheid, poverty is not natural. It is man-made and it can be overcome and eradicated by the actions of human beings . -Nelson Mandela

  •  Mission:-Engage, advocate and empower vulnerable population in the South-West Somalia, by helping them improve their socio-economic status, within their societies, thus becoming economic self-sufficient.

  • Vision:- SWSD to be the leading social service agency in breaking cycle of poverty of underserved population, through social  & economic justice, and sustainable economic development.

  •   Core Value:- Transparency~Accountability~Integrity                                     Non-partison  -  Non-political  -  Non-religion
  • Policies & Procedures Transparency
    With over 15 plus years of experience facilitating development projects, at SWSD we understand the importance of being a safe pair of hands for the funds and initiatives entrusted to us by our many donors and partners.
    We are committed to transparency and accountability in our work and have procedures and guidelines in place for all critical processes to ensure we meet and exceed the expectations of our partners in relation to project management, monitoring, performance management and quality assurance.

Spirit






  • http://initiativesinc.com/ peace and development partners partners in health
  • Educate A Girl To:- Make A Difference - Inspire A Community - Transform A Nation.                                                                                                                                                          Our vision is to create a country where all children, regardless of their financial status, will be socially, emotionally and intellectually prepared to succeed in school, life and in their community. At SWSD, we believe access to education is the fundamental right for all and not just a privilege for those who can afford it. We aim to provide a world class secondary school education for girls in Rwanda, supporting the ‘whole girl’ through a boarding school environment. We intend to develop a community of learners, which includes students, teachers, and parents. We support an environment of academic excellence, ensuring that graduates will become inspired young leaders filled with confidence, a love of learning and a sense of economic empowerment to strengthen their communities and foster country's growth. We will develop a new model for investing in the education of girls in Somalia rooted in connections to the local community, strengthened by national and international partnerships, and supported by diverse and sustainable sources of income.

  • Sustainable Development
           SWSD helps communities to grow their capacity to help themselves. Highlights this past year include building businesses that fund schooling, improving    
           production and teaching organic farming methods to feed families, and training and equipping clinics and health workers to radically improve community 
           well-being.

  • Emergency Relief
          Despite positive improvements to the peace in some areas, thousands remain in crisis across the Somalia. Basic medical needs and food supply  
          are still daily struggles for many, while education opportunities for children remain limited. In these times of crisis, where children and families are left most 
          vulnerable, SWSD has committed to go and help wherever we have been able.

  • Plan to coordinate drilling/building 3 wells and install water pumps; canals, reservoirs - concrete/plastic, to provide access to clean water. In addition to these water pumps, 36 toilets schools and clinics in Daafeet projecst to increase the level of hygiene.

  • SWSD provided handfull IVs and diarhea medicine, during cholera outbreak, immediate assistance to affected and at-risk 3 villages in Daafeet, during a cholera outbreak . Over 57 people were helped before the outbreak was bought under control within two months.

  • SWSD is committed to improving access to quality primary health care for people in underserved communities.  This will enable us coordinate, and deliver health services with the goal of providing solutions for better health. We create a tailored programs, projects and services that can meet the programmatic needs of the communities it serves.
  • About This Handbook
    Expanding Contraceptive Choice to the Underserved through Mobile Outreach Service Delivery: A Handbook for
    Program Planners provides general guidance on how to design and implement mobile outreach family planning
    services, and should be adapted to each country’s context.
    Whether your organization is the Ministry of Health (MOH), a service-delivery nongovernmental organization
    (NGO), or a community-based organization (CBO), mobile outreach can be an important addition to your
    program.
    We look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions on how to improve all the parts of this handbook
  • The PepsiCo Foundation provided $11 million in private matching funds to support the implementation of Diplomas Now in the study schools 


  • Education:- Our mission is to provide evidence-based models, tools and services to the most challenged secondary schools serving the most vulnerable students in the country.

TDS envisions a nation in which our most vulnerable students have access to an education that:
develops their unique strengths and talents;
builds their academic and socio-emotional competencies;
engages them in relevant and exciting learning opportunities;
supports them so they can succeed; and
prepares them for post-secondary education and the 21st century world of work
  • About This Handbook
Expanding Contraceptive Choice to the Underserved through Mobile Outreach Service Delivery: A Handbook for
Program Planners provides general guidance on how to design and implement mobile outreach family planning
services, and should be adapted to each country’s context.
Whether your organization is the Ministry of Health (MOH), a service-delivery nongovernmental organization
(NGO), or a community-based organization (CBO), mobile outreach can be an important addition to your
program.
We look forward to hearing your comments and suggestions on how to improve all the parts of this handbook

  • PRESS RELEASE – The United States Government, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), has reiterated its commitment to supporting juvenile justice reform across the Eastern and Southern Caribbean (ESC).

3- SUPPORTING COMMUNITY-BASED CARE
The Government of Kenya community

The Government of Kenya community health strategy recognizes the contribution ofcommunity health workers in improving access to and the quality of health-care services. Empowering communities to take charge of their health can prevent the most common illnesses or facilitate early treatment. This development improves health outcomes, saves time and money for rural families, and results in a signifi cant reduction in the need for acute care provided by county governments. USAID continues to support community-health extension workers and volunteers in providing a wide range of preventive health services, including
promotion of immunizations and HIV tests, as well as family planning, hygiene, sanitation, and nutrition education.
HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH: USAID partners with Kenya’s health sector leaders to build and retain a high quality health workforce. Teresia Nganga,
health records and information offi cer, is spearheading the transition to electronic recordkeeping, so all of the county’s health workers can be uploaded into the Human Resources Information System, open-source software that pulls together a basic set of data on health workers from various information systems in the
country. In 2014, USAID trained professionals in 37 counties on how to use the system.

MOBILE SOLUTIONS:
Community health workers are using smart technologies to save the lives of mothers and babies. The simple innovation of sending an appointment reminder
to pregnant mothers contributed to an increase in the number of Kenyan women who attended at least four antenatal care appointments.

Water:-
In Indonesia, the Government and USAID have entered into a partnership to provide sustainable water and sanitation services over five years. Sustainability means donors and recipients alike have assurances the services have actually been provided and will last.
With $38.7 million in USAID funding, the Indonesia Urban Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (IUWASH) project operates in 54 cities across the archipelago. The project is now in its third year and has reached 1,163,855 people with water services and 77,655 people with sanitation services.
USAID’s Global Water Coordinator Christian Holmes recently visited Indonesia, and found the success of IUWASH relies on five key factors. Most important is the close partnership developed between USAID and the Government of Indonesia at all levels. Second is the program’s commitment to deliver very specific services, in particular physical connections for water and sanitation services to households. These things are supported by the program’s very effective reporting and monitoring systems and a dedicated team from the U.S. Government, Indonesian government agencies, Indonesian utilities, and Indonesians and Americans working for USAID’s implementing partner, DAI. Finally, is the consistent, productive engagement of civil society in the country. With these in place, USAID should meet its five-year target. In that time, IUWASH is expected to:
  • Increase access to clean water for XXX  people in urban areas
  • Increase access to sanitation for 10,000 people in urban areas
  • Decrease per unit water costs paid by the urban poor by 55 percent
  • Provide 10,000 people with water- and sanitation-related training






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Literacy/Education